THE BLOOD OF LIL UZI VERT

Push me to the edge
All my friends are dead

As this song continues and he must repeat these somber, horrible words, Uzi sounds as if he is falling apart, hardly able to finish as they roll around for the 8th time.  Immediately what follows is a verse with sharp resilience — yet still self-aware of immense loss.  Within the context of art and as a listener, one can still perceive these lyrics metaphorically; because what we relate to is the loss of friends and family, something that everyone experiences.

As a listener and as lyrics in the context of pop music, we connect to that loss in our own ways.  There are degrees to loss and that’s why this connects to something within us all, even those only in proximity to the feeling.

However you look at it, black kids are dying from violence in America and here’s someone who is young, musically inclined and black.  What’s one of his best songs?  A song about how fucking alone it feels to have every one of your friends die.  He’s an artist and as such he is at liberty to choose how real his personal lyrical narrative becomes.  With this considered, the chorus blurs the line between whether or not it’s his girlfriend or himself talking — or both.  This is a particularly genius touch on what was already a song that went miles-deep.

As dark as this song is, it’s triumphant and glorious at its core — even life-affirming.  Vocally, possibly intentionally, Woods [Uzi Vert] has a similar vocal and existential vibe to Mark Hoppus of Blink-182 [just imagine Blink-182 with Uzi Vert as the lead].  In the early 00’s the angst of 182 was largely introspective, but in 2017 Lil Uzi Vert is channeling an angst based on external, environmental circumstances.

Uzi Vert is 100% okay as he reassures us on the opening (“Are you alright? I’m alright, I’m quite alright…”); but hearing him fall to pieces over the song (and keeping the hype of the song going) it’s just one of the best things you can hear right now.

 

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